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Page updated
2013-11-03

BOSCH DLR130 Digital Distance Measurer Temple RecordsTemple RecordsTemple RecordsTemple Records
A product review.

 
BOSCH's DLRK130 Laser Distance Measurer

I purchased both the DLR130and the GLR225.  After testing them I've decided to use the DLR130.  It's a little bit less confusing -- more intuitive to use since it has fewer bells and whistles.

 A Review of BOSCH's laser Distance Measurer

EXTERIOR
In order to determine how long it takes light to travel four inches, it takes a pretty damn sophisticated clock to accomplish that feat.

The DLRK130's case is made of sturdy plastic, in part, and also sports an easy-to-grip rubber outer surface which is pleasant to the touch and affords some protection against accidental damage. It seems to be solidly constructed. The battery compartment is easily accessed and the batteries are not cramped -- they are easy to replace.

DISPLAY
The black and white LCD screen is not parallel with the top surface of the unit; rather it is angled slightly inwards, making the angle of view more pleasant than if it were coplanar to the upper surface. There is no backlight and his has been a major stickler for other reviewers of this product.

THE BUTTONS
The buttons, although small, are generally well laid out and well labeled but in my opinion but some improvements could have been made.

The buttons are embodied as that common bubble / diaphragm panel structure which is ubiquitous in many electronic devices. This implementation requires considerable pressure to activate the unit's function buttons.

The button which is to be depressed at the instant of measurement requires substantial pressure; the distant lasered spot moves in response to that jerky reaction which results from a finger press. If the designers had seen fit to construct at least this one button differently so that it is were more sensitive, it would be much easier and less frustrating to exact measurements from small and distantly lasered targets.

UNITS OF MEASUREMENT
The common representations of units of measurement for the metric system and for the English system are represented and easily changeable from one to the other by stepping through the m/ft button. However, when the numbers from memory are displayed, not all units of measurements are available, and stepping through that button causes no change resulting from some of these button presses. This is slightly irritating because when one depresses a button one expects something to happen. It's a programming glitch or it's attributable to oversight on the part of Bosh's management, in my opinion.

MANUAL
The instructions are thoughtfully written. It's a small passport-size booklet, 19 pages, although on newsprint type paper and it has those multi language sections but they are not well identified. Items pointed out in the manual are referred to by their numbers on one main diagram; this makes for a great deal of page-flipping in this diminutive booklet. 

The Bosch Distance Measurer and its manual are made in Malaysia. I suspect the thing was designed in Germany because Bosch is a German company, well respected worldwide for its quality tools amongst other things.

TRIPOD
The measurer has the ability to measure distances from its front as well as from the rear surfaces (rear is the default). A standard threaded hole is provided on the bottom of the unit in order to attach the measurer to a tripod. Unfortunately this attachment point is located only near the middle of the unit and the no provision is made such that one might attach the thing to a tripod, measure one distance, rotate it 180° to measure the opposite distance and thus obtain a total. Measurements maybe made when this laser measurer accounts for the dimensions of its own size (from front or back) but not from the tripods position. I think this shortcoming is the greatest deficit of this measurer and it could have easily been designed into its functionality to obviate this shortcoming.

This, what to my mind is a serious deficit makes it very inconvenient to measure, say, the dimensions of some large room, as one would have to obtain its measurement by abutting the unit to a wall in order to measure a distance to the opposite wall. Such a one-step procedure is fine and simple for normal sized rooms that have no clutter so that one can walk up to the wall from which a laser measurement is to be taken.

For larger rooms where the midpoint of the room is within the maximum range of the unit, two tripod measurements from near the middle of the room, going in opposite directions would be preferred, and could easily be obtained by adding the distances of the opposite directions. Addition of measurement is a native functionality of this measurer, after all! As it is, this simple rotational measurement is not possible because measurements from the tripod location is not an option because the tripod location is unknown to the unit.

PACKAGING
Its box is standard, of the kind one might see hanging from a display hook at a hardware store. The packaging was clearly not designed by Steve Jobs.

Utility Pouch
A sturdy and roomy canvass carrying case is provided with which one may carry the unit attached to one's belt. (To see a good picture, G0OGL
'nowscape bosh').

LABELING
The warning labels affixed to both sides of this unit are small and impossible to read; however ample warnings are given in the manual regarding the danger of laser light to the eye.

ACCURACY AND RANGE
The shortest distance of measurement given in the specification is 2 inches; I was able to obtain a measurement of 1 15/16 inches inches. I have been unable to achieve the measurement of the maximum distance claimed according to the manual (of 131 feet). My maximum measurement at night, onto a snow bank, was 126 feet. The message "Err" obtains when an out-of-range measurement is attempted.

I have not tried to verify the accuracy claim. I have taken measurements using a tripod, to a spot and obtained exactly the same readings ad nauseam.  I have, however compared this unit's results with those of its sibling, the GLR225 Laser Distance Measurer and almost always identical readings result on both units.  When they differ, the difference is only in the third digit to the right of the decimal point.

The units can display three decimal positions after the decimal point but when measurements are transferred to the memory only two decimal positions remain visible on the display.

PRODUCT REGISTRATION AND PRIVACY
The product registration sheet which came with this thing a asks for some rather personal questions. You know the kind of product registration sheet – that thing nobody ever fills out, but some people do; and always they ask you to put your own postage stamp on it. For example, the product registration asks for your annual household income and whether you own lease or rent your home, etc. And this business of having to supply your own stamps in order to provide the manufacturers with information that they value, is how it's been since day one, and it's an enigma to me, especially in this day and age where businesses clamor to steal your personal information. I don't understand why businesses who collect such information about you expect the you, their target to pay for that postage, and why they don't use those business reply prepaid envelopes to encourage better cooperation from victims (http://nowscape.com/suck/junk_mail.htm).

WARRANTY
This unit has a three year limited warranty and a 30 days money-back guarantee.

OVERALL
I bought this to make a planned room annex for my house easier. I shall have to measure one existing room accurately and of course I'll have to measure things during construction. So, in preparation I've been fooling around with this thing, waving it all over the house and yard to measure things. "I've waved the thing all over the place/practiced til I was black in the face" :). So far I like this unit very much. Maybe I will post an update later after I use it in practice. And it makes an excellent cat laser toy too, BTW! The above occurred to me about the things that could have been changed or considered, some more easily done than others, or could have been thought about in the design of this very nice Bosch Distance Measurer.

Amazon doesn't permit external links in its reviews. If you G0OGL 'nowscape bosh' you can find this review and some pictures.

ADDENDUM
Bosch’s other model, the  GLR225: It has a built-in bubble vial to provides visual reference when measuring horizontal distances, and it provides 4 measuring reference points for optimum usage: back, front, tripod attachment point and a metal swing-out extension pin for measuring from inside corners or channels.

This review is also posted at http://nowscape.com/suck/BOSCH.htm ;  pictures.

 

 

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Page updated
2013-11-03

Bosch GLR225 Laser Rangefinder Temple RecordsTemple RecordsTemple Records
BOSCH  DLR130 Distance Measurer
Temple RecordsTemple RecordsTemple RecordsTemple Records
A product review and comparison.

 
Click / tap image to enlarge  BOSCH's DLRK130 and GLR225

 A Review of BOSCH's laser Rangefinder GLR225 & comparison with the DLR130. 

EXTERIOR
The unit is hefty. The case is made of sturdy plastic, in part, and also sports an easy-to-grip rubber outer surface which is pleasant to the touch and affords some protection accidental from damage. It seems to be solidly constructed. The battery compartment is easily accessed and the batteries are not cramped -- they are easy to replace.

DISPLAY
There is no backlight.

THE BUTTONS
The buttons, although small, are generally well laid out and well labeled but in my opinion, some improvements could have been made.

The buttons are embodied as that common bubble / diaphragm panel structure which is ubiquitous in many electronic devices. This implementation requires considerable pressure to activate the unit's function buttons.

The button which is to be depressed at the instant of measurement requires substantial pressure; the distance "laser spot" moves in response to a reaction which results from a finger press. If the designers had seen fit to construct at least this one button differently so that it is were more sensitive, it would be much easier and less frustrating to exact measurements from small and distantly lasered targets.

MEASUREMENT
The
GLR225's has the ability to measure distances from its front as well as from the rear surfaces (rear is the default). It can also make indirect length measurements by use of the Pythagorean theorem. Obtaining an accurate measurement by this method is very difficult because of inaccuracy of judgment as to when you are directly abeam, or 90° to the spot on the surface be measured.

The common representations of units of measurement for the metric system and for the English system are represented and easily changeable from one to the other by stepping through the m/ft button. However, when the numbers from memory are displayed, not all units of measurements are available.

MANUAL

in their respective manuals, the GLR225 is called a "Rangefinder"; the DLR130 is called a "Distance Measurer".
The GLR225's instructions are carelessly written; and some errors occur; it was obviously cut-and-pasted form its older sibling, the DLR130. It's a small passport-size booklet, 19 pages, on newsprint type paper. The unit's parts are labeled by number on one main diagram, pg.2;  the numbered parts are named on pg.9; this makes for a great deal of page-flipping in this booklet when item numbers only are called out in the discussion.

The Bosch Rangefinder and its manual are made in Malaysia. I suspect the thing was designed in Germany because Bosch is a German company, well respected worldwide for its quality tools amongst other things.

TRIPOD
A standard threaded hole is provided on the bottom of the unit in order to attach the GLR225 to a tripod. Four measuring reference points are provided: back, front, tripod attachment point and a metal swing-out extension pin for measuring from inside corners or channels. In actual use, successive button presses do not seem to step through these four successive measuring positions in sequence, sometimes skipping the position which the user wants to select.

When using the tripod attachment point, a convenient provision is made -- unlike for the DLR130 -- allowing one to measure one distance, rotate the unit 180° to measure the opposite distance and thus obtain a total by using the "M+" button.

The unit also sports as small bubble level to provide a rough visual reference when measuring horizontal distances.

PACKAGING
Its box is standard, of the kind one might see hanging from a display hook at a hardware store. The packaging was clearly not designed by Steve Jobs.

UTILITY POUCH
A uselessly small carrying case is provided; many complaints have been noted by other online reviewers. This is a gross oversight on the part of Bosch's management and quality control, in my opinion. The GLR225 comes with a handy wrist strap; the DLR130 does not, although it also has an attachment point for such a lanyard. (To see a good picture, G0OGL
'nowscape bosh').

LABELING
The warning labels affixed to both sides of this unit are small and impossible to read.

ACCURACY AND RANGE
The shortest distance of measurement given in the specification is 2 inches. I have been unable to achieve the measurement of the maximum distance of 230 feet claimed according to the manual. My maximum measurement at night, onto a snow bank, was 170 feet. The message "Err" obtains when an out-of-range measurement is attempted.

I have not tried to verify Bosch's accuracy claim but I have compared this unit's results with those of its sibling, the GLR225 Rangefinder and almost always identical readings result on both units.  When do they differ, the difference is only in the third digit to the right of the decimal point in the metric system display (see image).

I have taken measurements using a tripod, to a spot and obtained exactly the same readings ad nauseam. 

The units can display three decimal positions after the decimal point but when measurements are transferred to the memory only two decimal positions remain visible on the display.

OVERALL
I purchased both of these units. After testing the Bosch GLR225  and the DLR130 I've decided to use the DLR130.  It's a little bit less confusing to use since it has fewer bells and whistles.

Amazon doesn't permit external links in its reviews. If you G0OGL 'nowscape bosh' you can find this review and some pictures.

ADDENDUM
A queer thing happened when I tried to take pictures of the DLR130 and GLR225 side by side. I used a flash.  The display of the GLR225 always was blank in the pictures!  It was frustrating; I'd assumed that the thing always just timed out and had shut itself off during the setup time for the photos.  I eventually came to realize that the camera's flash caused the GLR225 to turn off at the instant (actually just before) the image was recorded on the CCD of the camera!

 

 

 

The BOSCH GL825 is in its own class. Click here to see it.

This review is also posted at http://nowscape.com/suck/BOSCH.htm#Bosch_GLR225 ;  pictures.

 

 

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Page updated  2013-11-03  by @Com